Query Letter (Aarrrgh!)

My first novel, Beautiful, is waiting for a final blessing from my editor. I don’t expect any significant changes at this point. The next thing for me to do, of course, is to find an agent. Ideally, I’d like someone who will sell a publisher on the idea of Beautiful. Of course! And who will work with me on marketing; I do what I can, and the agent does what he or she can. For sure! But most important, for me, is that I find an agent who is excited to work with me for the rest of my career which, God willing, will be another twenty years at least.

Aahhh, finding an agent! That means writing the best query letter I can. But what do agents want? What are they looking for? How can I avoid inadvertently turning them off? I researched query letters on the internet, but as Abraham Lincoln famously did not say, you can’t believe everything you read on the internet.

So, the last week of April, I attended (is that the correct verb for a webinar?) a Writers Digest webinar on writing query letters. The instructor, Maria Vicente, is an agent with P.S. Literary Agency. From what I can see online, it would be indeed a coup for a debut author to work with PSLA. The webinar was about 90 minutes long, with a bit over an hour being Maria’s presentation. The remainder was Q&A. Any questions that weren’t answered live were answered later as a supplemental download. The best part, from my perspective, was the opportunity for Maria to review my query letter.

I was actually pretty proud of the query letter I submitted although, as I mentioned in an earlier post, I was pretty proud of my writing ability in high school and it was a shock when, in Oberlin College, I learned how much more I had to learn. So it will be interesting to see what Maria thinks of my query.

Anyway, I’m chomping at the bit to start submitting query letters. This is where authors compete to see who overcame the most “no’s.” The conversation goes like this:

Author 1: “I had 192 rejections before I found someone who would read and accept my manuscript.”

Author 2: “Ha, that’s nothing. I had so many rejections, I need to write the number in scientific notation.”

I really do understand why many authors nowadays say, “This is stupid. I’ll just publish my manuscript my own damn self.” I won’t say I’ll never come to that conclusion myself. All I can tell you is that we need to be honest with ourselves and follow our heart. My dream is for my novels to be published through the traditional pathway and to see my work on bookstore shelves. That said, I wish the “traditional pathway” would move faster.

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